Skip to main content

Accessibility at CMU

We design, make and study technology to make the world accessible.


We are researchers, teachers, and people with disabilities at CMU making the world more accessible.

headshot of Chieko Asakawa

Chieko Asakawa

is an IBM Fellow and Distinguished Service Professor in HCII and RI. She developed the first screen reader for the Web and invented the idea of crowdsourcing accessibility years before "crowdsourcing" was a term.

headshot of Jeffrey P. Bigham

Jeffrey P. Bigham

is an associate professor in HCII and LTI. He builds access technology combining machine learning, NLP, and computer vision with the on-demand labor of people from the web (the crowd). He also manages this web page.

Cole Gleason

Cole Gleason

is a Ph.D. student in HCII, and his work focuses on helping people with visual impairments get around and explore the world more independently using crowdsourcing and computer vision.

Anhong Guo

Anhong Guo

is a PhD student in HCII. He works on leveraging the increasing availability of wearable devices and bringing together the strengths of computer vision and crowdsourcing to solve accessibility issues.

Jen Mankoff and her dog Gryffin

Jen Mankoff

is a professor in HCII. Jen works on the uses of advanced technology such as toolkits ubiquitous computing, 3d printing, and mobile devices to support accessibility on the web and in the world.

headshot of Luz Rello

Luz Rello

is postdoc in HCII. She is a world expert on dyslexia and the Web. Her work contributes an understanding of the errors that people with dyslexia make from an NLP perspective. She has deployed fun games to thousands with dyslexia who have played to improve their reading and writing.

headshot of Aaron Steinfeld

Aaron Steinfeld

is an associate research professor in RI. He works on helping people get places and get things done with universal design, intelligent transportation systems, crowdsourcing, human-robot interaction, and machine learning.

Kristin Williams

is a PhD student in HCII. She is interested in how wearable computing and augmented reality could facilitate functional communication in contexts demanding a high degree of linguistic skill.


Our work is made possible by our sponsors:
National Science Foundation National Institute on Disability Rehabilitation Research

Sponsors help to set our research directions, and also receive exclusive access to team members and early results. If you are interested in sponsoring accessibility work at CMU, please contact one of the faculty members or project leads listed above. If you're unsure who would be most appropriate, send email to who will help to direct your mail to a the right place.

Join Us!

If you are part of the CMU or the local community who would like to become part of Accessibility@CMU please send email to If you would like to be listed on this page, simply send me a 200x200 photo, a short bio (like above), and a link to your web site. Accessibility@CMU does not have its own faculty or degree programs. If you are interested in joining CMU as a student, faculty, or staff, please apply to one of the many relevant degree programs on campus. Many of us are part of the Human-Computer Interaction Institute and Robotics Institute in the School of Computer Science.